Event calendar
2017. November
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
Pál Kiss Museum - Tiszafüred
Open-air picture of the Kiss Pál Museum
Address: 5350, Tiszaf├╝red Tariczky s├ęt├íny 6.
Phone number: (59) 352-106
Opening hours: Tue-Sat 9-12, 13-17
applied art, clay art, ceramics, ethnography, folk art, furniture making, permanent exhibition, wood-an bone carving
Share it, if you like it:
Museum tickets, service costs:
Ticket for adults
500 HUF
/ capita
Group ticket for adults
(min. 10 people)
150 HUF
/ capita
Ticket for students
250 HUF
/ capita
Ticket for pensioners
250 HUF
/ capita
Ticket for families
(2 adults + max. 3 children)
750 HUF
/ family
Program ticket
300 HUF
/ capita
Season ticket
1000 HUF
Group guide
(max. 40 people)
2000 HUF
/ group
Photography
1000 HUF
Video
1000 HUF
The artisans founded guilds at the beginning of the 19th century. The reason of the development of Tiszaf├╝red into a center of commerce was the strengthening of trade from the middle of the 18th century.

Panels were made in many places of Hungary but among them, those made in Tiszaf├╝red were the most famous. Some of them were even taken to Prussia. Under the time of the War of Independence, the panel makers still worked. Their work was necessary until 1868 when the hussar saddles appeared.
The saddle of F├╝red was made of two kinds of tree. The one on the back of the horse was made of soft wood. On those, two pommels was placed made of hard wood. The pommel was tied with leather, which was covered with either leather of sheep or stuffed leather. Some of the saddles were ornamented.

The other important trade was pottery. The glazed ceramics were extremely sought for. They were burned twice: for the first time they received the base color, the second time glaze was put on them and they were burned again which made them so shiny
In the last third of the 19th century, Tiszaf├╝red became the second largest center for bowls. The ornamentation that had been used before changed: the new patterns were geometric.
By the first part of the 20th century, the pottery was not so sought for. The potters had to find another trade to work in. The pottery trade seized to exist completely after WWI.

The red furniture can be traced to the Reformation Age. At the beginning the painting of furnitures was dark, a harmonic bunch of flower was surrounded by a circle. The furniture were painted with red, yellow, blue, white, and sometimes with green.
At the beginning of the 19th century, the ornaments were painted on a new base. The ribs of trees were highlighted.
Instead of the circles, dense flowers were preferred from the last fourth of the 19th century. This kind of painted furniture was succeeded by the simple brown painted ones from the 20th century.

Beside the products of the trade, the visitors may see products of vernacular art at our exhibition as well. Textiles, embroidery, leather works, and carvings are also displayed.