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Ferenc Hopp Museum of Asian Arts - Budapest
The museum building
Address: 1062, Budapest Andrássy út 103.
Phone number: (1) 322-8476
Opening hours: Mon-Sun 10-18
Ferenc Hopp was born on 28, April 1833 in the village of Fulnek in Moravia in a German speaking family.

He moved to Pest in 1845 supported by a local optician, István Calderoni. After he received the certificate of helpers, he moved to Wien to gain experience. Soon he found himself in New York, USA where he spent four years before returning to Pest.

In Pest, he married the only daughter of Calderoni and became partner in the business of his father-in-low. He divorced half a year later and never married again.

The profit he gained from the business was enough for him to enjoy his hobbies, namely to study geography and geology, to travel, and collect objects of art. He traveled almost everywhere on earth. He visited Expos; he traveled the Oceans and the new railways of Europe and America.

He started off on his first journey around the world in 1882. Four others followed this expedition. He visited Australia, India, China, Japan, North- and South America, and Africa. He made a lot of photos, collected minerals, objects of art, jewelry, which he used for scientific purposes. He gave several lectures on his traveling at the meetings of the Hungarian Associations of Geography.

He died on 9, September, 1919 in his cottage on Andrássy Street. In his will, he left several valuables to people and gave order for the foundation of the Hopp Museum.

In 1919, Zoltán Felvinczi Takács began organizing the institution. It became a real museum in the following years with the help of the Museum of Fine Arts. The original material was complemented with material from the East taken from the National Museum. In 1906-7, the painting and wood engraving collection of Péter Vay, which he bought in Japan, was moved from the Museum of Fine Art. The collection of Dr. Tivadar Duka, the Japanese painting collection of Attila Szemere, the Wegener Chinese textile collection, and the archeological material of the expedition of Jenő Zichy taken in the Caucasus and in South Siberia in 1892-1903 was also moved to the museum. The Museum of Applied Arts provided objects brought at several Expos.

Between WWI and WWII, the museum performed little transactions. However, it was given numerous presents: that of Imre Schwaiger, Hungarian art vendor in Delhi collected an internationally significant material of art objects from India and Nepal.

Throughout the time of the siege of Budapest, ten percent of the material of the museum was lost. After the building was renovated, the museum began to develop again. Many professionals who were involved in the culture and art collections of the East started working for the museum with new dynamics. Among the new generation, we can mention the name of Ervin Baktay, India researcher, Dr. Tibor Horváth, scientist of Japanese art, Károly Gombos, the scientist of the culture of Caucasus, and Pál Miklós, sinologist.

After 1945, many presents were given to the Museum by the Socialist countries. The collection was also complemented by presents of private individuals besides the heritages. The audience may visit the thematic exhibitions of Eastern Art in the György Ráth Museum of the Museum of Applied Arts.

Nowadays the museum has over 20 000 objects. Two of the biggest collections present the art of Japan and China but our art collection from India, Korea, Indonesia, the Islam, and Vietnam is also significant. The library of the museum has over 22 000 volumes to provide the researchers with sufficient material.