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Albertfalva Region History Collection and School Museum - Budapest
Museum entrance
Address: 1116, Budapest Pentele utca 8.
Phone number: (1) 208-6635
Opening hours: Tue, Thu 16-18
(Closed in school breaks)
The name of the school had not come about up by accident, for down to 1848 it was well known that the majority of Albertfalva belonged to the group of Kossuth-supporters. This spirit penetrated the work of the school; this gave energy to both teachers and students to ever bring high quality into their work. continue
Permanent exhibitions
Equipment of the former class room
Besides the primary school training, the education of industry students also began in the second half of the 11th century. Students were taught Hungarian and German languages. On one side of the desk there is the Hungarian, on the other side the Austrian arms. continue
A taste of the exhibition
Following the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, the extensive economical, industrial and cultural development taking place proved that the formerly active coops did not function according to the requirements of the times. The Act 17 of 1884 accordingly required qualification to practice trade. It also organized trade authorities, ordering the formation of trade associations on the territory of every trade authority to which every tradesman was obliged to join. continue
Roman excavations
The central settlement of the Celtic Eraviscus tribe was situated in the Southern slope of the St Gell├ęrt-hill, Budapest. In the first half of the 1st century the Roman government moved some part of the Eraviscus people to the plains of Albertfalva. A significant part of the ancient settlement lay in Albertfalva. continue
Sachsenfeld seal from 1825
The R├íckeve dominion was shifted into the ownership of M├íria Krisztina (5th child of M├íria Ter├ęzia) through a marriage she made in 1766 with Wettin Albert K├ízm├ęr ├ügost (1738-1822) - prince of Sz├íszteschen. After her death the dominion was inherited by her husband. continue