Event calendar
2024. June
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
2024.04.20. - 2024.11.24.
Budapest
2023.12.15. - 2024.02.18.
Budapest
2023.11.16. - 2024.01.21.
Budapest
2023.11.09. - 2024.03.17.
Budapest
2023.10.27. - 2024.02.11.
Budapest
2023.10.18. - 2024.02.18.
Budapest
2023.09.22. - 2024.01.21.
Budapest
2012.03.01. - 2012.03.31.
Vác
2012.02.01. - 2012.02.29.
Miskolc
2012.01.22. - 1970.01.01.
Budapest
2011.10.04. - 1970.01.01.
Nagykáta
2011.10.01. - 1970.01.01.
Nagykáta
2011.10.01. - 1970.01.01.
Nagykáta
2011.09.30. - 1970.01.01.
Nagykáta
2011.09.30. - 1970.01.01.
Nagykáta
2011.07.04. - 2011.07.08.
Budapest
State Care of National Monuments - The De la Motte-Palace - Budapest
Address: 1014, Budapest Dísz tér 15.
Phone number: (30) 580-1417
Opening hours: The palace is open during the programs.
The Board of Trustees of National Monuments was established in June 1992 to control the finances of national monuments and parks belonging to them. The objective of the institution was to restore national monuments in Hungary to European standard and include them into the cultural and tourist mainstream. It is the only national institution fulfilling such task.


The headquarters once belonged to the de la Motte family. De la Motte (Jolly des Alnois) was the lieutenant-colonel of Ferenc Károly. He and his wife Neuer és Hochenberg Krisztina bought the building in Buda in 1760 built on the ruins of a house destroyed during the siege of Buda in 1686.

The dilapidated houses was given to Gertrud, the wife of Waigl Fülöp on 25 June 1696. The carpenter, Schulz János Lőrinc, and his wife, Margit, bought the houses from them in 1723 and rebuilt them together in the early Baroque style.

The de la Motte family added a gate entrance and a corridor upstairs, as well as the facade that is still visible today. The new palace also signed the rise of the family. Franz I of Lotharingia, the husband of Maria Teresa, gave the title count to the de la Motte family in 1760. However, the de la Motte family did not dwell long in the palace. They sold it to Beer József, royal and military chemist.

(except from the book by Bardi Terézia - Mrs. Wisnovszky Hajdi Márta: National Monuments under National Protection, 2004)