Event calendar
2018. December
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
Hungarian Museum of Trade and Tourism - Budapest
The museum building
Address: 1036, Budapest Korona t├ęr 1.
Phone number: (1) 212-1245
Opening hours: Tue-Sun 10-18
The exhibition has closed for visitors.
2004.07.07. - 2004.11.07.
temporary exhibition
Share it, if you like it:
Museum tickets, service costs:
Ticket for adults
800 HUF
/ capita
Ticket for students
400 HUF
/ capita
Ticket for pensioners
400 HUF
/ capita
Ticket for families
(2 adults + 1 child)
1500 HUF
/ family
Ticket
640 HUF
/ capita
Guide
2000 HUF
Guide
3000 HUF
Humanity has always been interested in bending of different material of diverse states. The most well known blend of gas and liquid is the sparkling water. This water found itself in the center of attention because of its positive effect when drinking of it or bathing in it. Soda water was recognized and utilized early.

In the age of Enlightenment people wanted to copy nature. Several experiments led to the exploration of soda. The English scientist, Joseph Priestley, was the first who mixed CO2 with water in 1767. Soon after Jacob Schweppe did the same in 1783, but he kept his method to create sparkling water in large amount secret. In 1813 Charles Plinth created and in the same year patterned the siphon head.

Our scientist priest, Ányos Jedlik made his discoveries in 1826 when he wished to blend the water taken from Balatonfüred with carbonic acid. This is how the history of Hungarian soda water industry began. Even though Jedlik himself began manufacturing soda in 1841, his business did not last long and handed the trade over to his nephew. Jedlik did not get rich of his invention but in the last 175 years dozens of families and generations trusted their income on sparkling water.

These families were provided with the means of living, others like us refreshment and enjoyment. It is the natural company of our every days. It is a basic drink which is a must on the table of every walk of life.

We mix soda water with wine and syrup; we believe in its healing power, we use it to cook, and to clean. It inspired several of our artists; it is a topic of literal works. It reached the cultic standard in our lives by the power of its simplicity, usefulness, and extreme power.

It is an enlightening experience to meet. We desire it; we are the prisoner of it. We enjoy its every drop. We remain loyal to it in every situation, we tell it of our pain and hurt and have fun with it at the same time. We have a place for it at our tables as much as in our lives. We possess it, we transubstantiate it. It eases our thirst and lights up our fire. It bombs us with bubbles and refreshes us as a waterfall. It breaks in our world and smoothes our problems. It gives us peace and disturbs us.

It is a faithful partner until the day of our death.